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January, 2009

January 29, 2009

But This Remedy is Not Always Available or Reliable

by Judith Schaeffer, Vice President, Constitutional Accountability Center

January 26, 2009

Today, the Supreme Court issued a ruling in favor of the prosecutors in Van de Kamp v. Goldstein, a case that addressed whether prosecutors have absolute immunity from liability for failing to provide criminal defendants with constitutionally-required exculpatory information.

January 16, 2009

By Judith E. Schaeffer, Vice President, Constitutional Accountability Center

January 15, 2009

If there were ever a topic over which state governments were certain to reach universal agreement, it would be whether the federal government, and specifically the executive branch, has the unfettered right to “preempt” their laws.

Yet, despite conservatives’ purported respect for the states and federalism, for eight years the Bush Administration has aggressively fought to uphold federal preemption of a wide range of state laws, including environmental regulations, consumer safety protections, antitrust laws, and others.

January 12, 2009

In November, Constitutional Accountability Center (CAC) joined the American Constitution Society (ACS) in hosting The Second Founding and the Reconstruction Amendments: Toward a More Perfect Union, a two-day conference celebrating the importance of the post-Civil War Amendments in realizing our Constitution’s progressive promise.

January 9, 2009

by Doug Kendall, President, Constitutional Accountability Center

January 8, 2009

Earlier this week we reported that CAC, on behalf of itself and 27 other national, state, and local organizations that are committed to preserving judicial independence and integrity, filed a Supreme Court brief in Caperton v. A.T. Massey Coal Company.

January 5, 2009

by Doug Kendall and Elizabeth Wydra

January 5, 2009

by Judith E. Schaeffer, Vice President, Constitutional Accountability Center

Happy New Year from Text & History! While we and many others were away enjoying the holiday break, a number of events occurred around the country that implicate several different provisions of the Constitution, including some lesser known but hardly insignificant portions of the text. Americans may take a vacation, but the Constitution never does. Here’s a recap: