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Text & History Blog

When the police arrest someone, is it unconstitutional for them to then search through the contents of that person’s cellphone without a warrant?
Efforts to reduce the Constitution to one principle usually end up oversimplifying our nation’s fundamental charter, mangling it in the process.  So is the case with George Will’s recent column for the Washington Post, which argues that “progressi
Do you have a cell phone?  Does it contain private information you’d like to keep private—texts, emails, call logs, pictures, calendars, and the like?  If so, you should be paying attention later this month when the Supreme Court hears oral argument in Riley v. California and United States v.
Sometimes counting to five is more complicated than you’d think.  Imagine a case before the Supreme Court in which a criminal defendant challenges his state court conviction on the ground that he was convicted by a non-unanimous jury.  Assume that five Justices conclude that the Sixth Amendment...

Blog Post Series

Defending the Voting Rights Act

In the wake of an election season in which the Voting Rights Act proved its mettle as the last, best hope against voter suppression efforts, the Supreme Court will be reviewing the constitutionality of a key part of this iconic civil rights statute in a case called ...

Obama Judicial Nominees in Limbo

CAC has documented the U.S. Senate’s  unprecedented obstruction of President Obama’s judicial nominees — under the direction of Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY). 

CAC in Court

Constitutional Accountability Center chooses the best cases to bring our ideas about the Constitution into court and secure victories in the U.S. Supreme Court, state supreme courts, and federal courts of appeal that move the law closer to the text and history of our Constitution. 

 

Originalist Sins

Conservative Justices like Antonin Scalia and Clarence Thomas get a great deal of criticism (from the left) and praise (from the right) for being “originalists” and committing to follow the “original meaning” of the Constitution’s text.  Constitutional Accountability Center comes at this debate...

Text & History Blog

April 23, 2014

When the police arrest someone, is it unconstitutional for them to then search through the contents of that person’s cellphone without a warrant?

April 18, 2014

Efforts to reduce the Constitution to one principle usually end up oversimplifying our nation’s fundamental charter, mangling it in the process.  So is the case with George Will’s recent column for the Washington Post, which argues that “progressi

April 11, 2014

Do you have a cell phone?  Does it contain private information you’d like to keep private—texts, emails, call logs, pictures, calendars, and the like?  If so, you should be paying attention later this month when the Supreme Court hears oral argument in Riley v. California and United States v.